Thursday, April 30, 2015

T is for The Brides of Funkenstein & Tamar Kali

The Brides of Funkenstein is a funk duo comprised of Dawn Silva (vocalist, guitarist) and Lynn Mabry. The duo got it start while performing with the Parliament Funkadelic. A rep from Atlantic records took notice and signed the group and the rest was history according to the duo. With the Parliament Funkadelic the two ladies had already found fame singing with the group; they can be heard singing on many of the Parliament Funkadelic's most notable hits like Flashlight,Tear the Roof Off, and Atomic Dog just to name a few.
   The duo released their debut album in 1978 titled Funk or Walk this album kept more in line with the funk sound that the duo was known for but still packed a punch. It sold over 500,000 copies and made it to the #7 spot of the R&B Billboard charts. It was not until the release of their second album titled Never Buy Texas from a Cowboy where they began to embrace a more rock & funk sound that went on to earn them the title as one of Rolling Stone Magazine's 50 Coolest Albums of All Time.


http://www.bridesoffunk.com/#!the-brides














 
Tamar-kali (Tamara Colletta Brown) is an American Rock singer and songwriter from Brooklyn, NY. She plays a mixture of hard rock and hardcore punk rock. She instantly became drawn to music and used it as way to cope with the loneliness of being an only child.
   She began her career in 1992, where she performed around New York as a member of the band FunkFace, which was a band who played a fusion of funk, hard rock and reggae. Although she loved playing this music, her passion was more attuned to rock, hard rock to be more exact, which led her to sign on the all-male band Song of Seven where she became the lead singer of the band. She has spoken in many interviews about the isolation she not only felt as an only child and later a teen trying to discover her identity but also as a Black woman in the rock industry that was predominately white and male. She mention's in one interview with Teresa Wiltz of the Washington Post that once she began meeting other African Americans who were not only playing the music but also who enjoyed the music, there was finally a sense of belonging; that moment were you come to realize that you aren't alone and that there are others like you. 
   After singing backup for many notable acts like Outkast & Fishbone she started her own production company in 2005 (Flaming Yoni Productions) and she released The Geechee Goddess: Hardcore Warrior Soul. She became an instant star on the underground rock scene after playing many shows and after the release of her debut album. However, when she appeared in the documentary Afro-Punk: The Rock' n' Roll Nigger Experience(2003) she moved on from being known as an underground artist; not only had the documentary been distributed nationally, she become nationally known.
     I can remember first learning about Tamar-kali in. As she was telling her story; and her voice is one of those voices that is powerful and unique, you can hear the sadness in it but also the strength. I also gravitated towards her because she mentioned how she became engulfed by rock music because she could see herself within it and also likened it back to her African roots, such as seeing pictures of Africans who wore tribal clothing and jewelery, the hairstyles and piercings, and some of the dancing which in her eyes a few resembled how white kids moshed in the pit. 
    http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-3057100052.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamar-kali
http://www.tamar-kali.com/





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