Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Y is for Yemaya and Yumboes


    Yemaya is an Orisha or mother goddess of the Yoruban culture. She is one of the most powerful Orishas and she governs over the waters, motherhood, and protects children. Her feast day is September 7th and her colors are blue, white, and silver. She loves  sea shells, fish, sea horses and dolphins; anything relating to the bodies of water. Her symbols are the moon, pearls, mermaids, sea creatures, dolphins, and white flowers. Offerings made to this Orisha should be flowers (mainly white), soap, perfume, yams, grains, melons, shells and jewelery (pearls, especially).






 Source: www.eaglewingsofenlightenment.org/mother-yemaya.html


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Artist depiction of Yumboes by XsunnybirdX

      Yumboes are African fairy like creatures who's story originates from the Wolof people of Senegal, West Africa. They are  2ft tall, and they are thought to be the deceased ancestors of the people. They are also said to dress in the traditional dress of the Wolof People.  Yumboes are friendly beings who pick a family to look over and they protect them until they pass away. When one member of the family passes away, they are said to have a feast and they dance on the deceased members grave in remembrance of them.
     Their place of residence (Kingdom, perhaps?) is said to be located in the subterranean land that is three miles from the coast on the Pap Hills. While these fairy-like creatures are friendly, they can be a bit mischievous due to the fact that they love corn so much they steal it from the people of the land. They also enjoy fish and plum wine. They love to dance, play the drums and sing.

Although there are not many pictures that I found, I did find pictures of black fairies of course so if I were to write a story about
these creatures, I'd envision them like this:

Aziza fairy queen by mickiemullerart
Artwork by Diannan Giovanna



Sources:

www.mythicalcreatureslist.com/mythical-creature/Yumboes

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/tfm/tfm185.htm

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